Category Archives: Tools

Munro Carbide Cutter

This is the 1st of 3 blog entries I am going to release on Carbide Cutters.

Photo: $12 Carbide Cutter for Munro Hollower II $12 Carbide Cutter for Munro Hollower II

A replacement Carbide Cutter for the Munro Hollower II is $20+ from numerous commercial retailers.

The "12mm Round Shear Insert Fits 4 Tool RD12S" from Az Carbide is the same product for only $12.

I have several of them from Az Carbide and they work fine!

The Az Carbide web site says it is for #4 Hunter Tool. It does not mention Munro Hollower II. This is bad marketing. The Munro Hollower II and #4 Hunter Tool use the same cutter.

Note: This cutter will NOT fit the new Munro Wundercutt10 Hollower. It uses a 10mm cutter. The "10mm Round Carbide Shear Insert RD10S Fits 3 & 5 Tool" from Az Carbide may work. I DO NOT KNOWN! I have not tried it.

Photo: Az Carbide Shopping Cart Az Carbide Shopping Cart

You can purchase things from Az Carbide's eBay store or directly from www.azcarbide.com.

Prices are little cheaper and shipping is flat rate $3 at www.azcarbide.com.

Note: Az Carbide is just one of several vendors who are selling carbide cutters on eBay.

Photo: Munro Hollower II Munro Hollower II

The "12mm Round Shear Insert Fits 4 Tool RD12S" from Az Carbide fits the Munro Hollower II. The one in the photo on the right.

Photo: Get a Carbide Cutter Tip Get a Carbide Cutter

One of the tips in my "Munro Hollower Demo" write up is:

"Get a Carbide Cutter for your Munro Hollower!

At $24 the carbide cutter for the Munro Hollower2 is not cheap. But it is a great investment because it will really speed up the learning process.

The HSS cutters that come standard with the Munro Hollowers suck because you have to stop often to rotate the cutter to a new sharp area or sharpen the cutter. Sharpening the cutter is extremely frustrating!

Each time you stop to dork with the cutter and then go back to work. It is like you have a completely new tool that you have to learn to use all over again from scratch!

…"


See http://www.carlford.info/pages/demos_classes/munro_hollower/Munro_Hollower.pdf

Drill Press Vise

Photo: Groz UG100-3 Drill Press Vise Groz UG100-3 Drill Press Vise

Long ago I got this drill press vise that I really like. It is a Groz UGL100-3 made in India.

My friends and students also really like this vise when they use it. They want to get one. But, until recently I had to tell them they were out of luck. I could not find anyone still selling it.

That changed recently when I found a very similar one on Zoro (www.zoro.com) made by Dayton #4CPG1.

I used this vise mostly for drilling metal things. But, I also use it for plastic pipe (often) and wooden things (not very often).

Photo: Why I Really Like It Why I Really Like It

I really like this drill press vise, because it is:

1. The right size and weight.

2. It has both horizontal and vertical V slots that allow me to securely hold round stock while drilling.

3. It has a ledge at the top of the jaws that allow me to securely hold bar stock up at the top of jaws where I can see it while I drill it.

4. There is a lot of space between the "ways" on the vise. Thus I can drill all the way thru things with out hitting the ways. Note: If I don't want something to drop thru the ways then I add a crap piece of wood across the ways.

Photo: What I Did Not Like and How I Fixed It What I Did Not Like and How I Fixed It

The only thing I did not like about this vise is the handle is hard to tighten up really tignt because it does not have a cross bar (tommy bar).

The vise comes with just a small hole in the handle. See photos below of new vise at Zoro.

I solved my problem by drilling out the hole so it was large enough to take the "Red Bar" that comes with Oneway Chucks and Faceplates.

Now I really like the vise handle. For most things, just hand tight is good enough. I don't need the red bar. When I need it really tight, I get the red bar.

Note: No cross bar (tommy bar) on the vise handle means you can easily position it anywhere on the drill press table with out having to dork around with the cross bar.

Photo: Horizonal V SLot In Use Horizontal V Slot In Use

Here is an example of the horizontal V slot in use.

Photo: Vertical V Slot In Use Vertical V Slot In Use

Here is an example of the vertical V slot in use.

I rarely use the vise for this. Because, I do most of this thing kind of drilling in my metal or wood lathe. But, when I need it. It is there.

Note: You can't really see the middle vertical V slot that is being used in this photo. It is to the left of the aluminum blank being drilled out. The drill press vise has 3 vertical V slots. A left one, middle one, and a right one. Only the left one is visable in the photo. Take a look at the other photos above to see all 3 slots.

Photo: Ledge In Use Ledge In Use

Here is an example of the ledge at the top of jaws in use.

Notice how you can drill a hole all the way thru something near the end. The work is still well supported in the middle of the vise. It does not drop thru the "ways" of the vise.

Photo: Plywood Table Plywood Table

This is the same photo as above. Notice how I secure this drill press vise to my drill press table with just 1 big screw into a plywood table that fits over the cast iron table on my drill press.

I REALLY like this set up. Because, I can quickly install or remove the vise by just lifting up the plywood table.

I can also just take the whole table over to the trash can and empty any shavings into the can.

For most things 1 screw is secure enough and allows me to easily position the vice. I add a 2nd screw once in a blue moon when needed.

Photo: Bottom of Plywood Table Bottom of Plywood Table

Its not pretty. But it work goods.

The boards that I attached to the bottom of the plywood hold the vise securely in place via its own weight. The boards prevent the vise and plywood from twisting out of my hand if a drill "catches". I don't need to waste time bolting the vise down each time I use it.

Note: There is no little board in the back right hand corner. It split on me and broke off. Maybe some day, I will replace it. But, I doubt it.

Photo: Cast Iron Drill Press Table Cast Iron Drill Press Table

Here is what my raw drill press table looks like.

Thus the boards on the bottom of the plywood table just fit over the square table.

If I had a round table, I would do the same thing. I would leave a board sticking down where the table connects to the main drill press post. This would stop plywood rotation on the round table.

Photo: Dayton 4CPG1 Drill Press Vice at Zoro Dayton 4CPG1 Drill Press Vice at Zoro

Dayton 4CPG1 horizontal and vertical dril press vice.

This one is very similar (the same?) as the Groz UG100-3 drill press vice I have.

It is avaialble from Zoro (www.zoro.com) as Zoro #G1791151. $96 on 10/29/2017.

Photo: Dayton 31LZ65 Drill Press Vice at Zoro Dayton 31LZ65 Drill Press Vice at Zoro

Dayton 31LZ65 horizontal only drill press vice.

If I had it to do again, I might get this one. It is very similar to Dayton 4CPG1 horizontal and vertical drill press vice. But, it is a little less money and I never use my vice in vertical mode.

It is avaialble from Zoro (www.zoro.com) as Zoro #G9193581. $82 on 10/29/2017.

Note: Dayton also makes a smaller (3") and a larger (4-3/4") version of the same vise. They look ok.

Dayton also makes a similar looking 31LZ68 vise. It is green. I don't like the looks of that one. It only has one set of vertical V slots. The horizontal V slot looks to high to me. It also does not have a ledge at the top of the jaws.

Photo: Close Up of Dayton 4CPG1 Drill Press Vise Close Up of Dayton 4CPG1 Drill Press Vise

Horizontal and vertical dril press vise.

Very similar to (the same as?) Groz VG100-3.

Very similar to Dayton 31LZ65 vertical only drill press vise.

Dayton 4CPG1, Zoro G1791151

Jaw Width 4", Jaw Opening 3-1/2", Throat Depth 1-3/16", Height 2.37", Length 10.86", Made In India

Photo: Close Up of Dayton 31LZ65 Drill Press Vise Close Up of Dayton 31LZ65 Drill Press Vise

Horizontal only drill press vise. Very similar to Dayton 31LZ65.

Dayton 31LZ65, Zoro G9193581

Jaw Width 4", Jaw Opening 4", Throat Depth 1-1/4", Height 2.5", Length 11", Made in India

Note: Dayton also makes a smaller (3") and a larger (4-3/4") version of the same vise. They look ok.

Dayton also makes a similar looking 31LZ68 vise. It is green. I don't like the looks of that one. It only has one set of vertical V slots. The horizontal V slot looks to high to me. It also does not have a ledge at the top of the jaws.

Hang Up your Power Sanding Drills


Photo: Hang Up Your Power Sanders

I like to keep my Power Sanding Drills handy by hanging them on the front of my lathe.

My friends and students have copied this idea.  Thus it must be a good one?


Photo: Hang Up Your Power Sanders

Here is how I do it.  I turn a simple knob out of scrap wood and mount it on the front of my lathe.  I drill and tap a hole for a 1/4″ bolt. See photo.

It looks like I goofed. Both sanders in the photo appear to have a 2" mandrel on them. Normally I keep a 2" mandrel on one of them and a 3" mandrel on the other.


Photo: Hang Up Your Power Sanders

Then I carefully drill a hole in the case of my drill and run a piece of flexible electrical wire thru the hole. I drill the hole in a corner where they is really nothing inside of the case.  In the photo you can see some scrap number 18 gray wire with a green stripe.  One half of a chuck of brown lamp cord (zip cord) would work just as good.  Stranded wire is more flexible than solid wire.



Note: I like to use a 55 Degree Close Quarters Drill for power sanding. I get my drills from the Sanding Glove (www.thesandingglove.com) because they test their drills before selling them and they have metal gears. All of the ones on Amazon, etc get lousy reviews due to plastic gears or bearings that don’t last long!