1st Plate on New Powermatic 2014 Lathe

Meta Description: The first thing Carl turned on his new Powermatic 2014 Lathe was a plate. It was a pleasure. Step by step photos.

Photo: 1 of 6 Blog Posts (pm2014_1st_plate_00)

1 of 6 Blog Posts

This is 1 of 6 blog posts on the Powermatic 2014 Lathe. The posts are:

  1. "Carl's New Powermatic 2014 Lathe"
  2. "Carl's New Powermatic 2014 Lathe Stand"
  3. "1st Plate on New Powermatic 2014 Lathe"
  4. "1st Bowl on New Powermatic 2014 Lathe"
  5. "1st Hollow Form on New Powermatic 2014 Lathe"
  6. "Revolutionary New 110 Volt Lathes"
Note: Below. "PM" = Powermatic. "PM 2014" = Powermatic 2014 Lathe

1st Plate on New Powermatic 2014 Lathe

Photo: 1st Plate on New Powermatic 2014 Lathe (pm2014_1st_plate_01)

The first thing I turned on my new Powermatic 2014 Late was a plate. I like to turn plates and then use them as a canvas that I can decorate. I kept this one simple. Round and Brown with Pizzazz for Etsy.

The plate is 9.75" diameter. 1" thick. Maple wood. Black and brown stain. Semi gloss acrylic finish. The radial textures were done on the lathe with a spiraling tool. See "Glamor Shots" at the end of this blog entry for more photos.

No Stand

I turned this plate BEFORE I made a stand for my new PM 2014 lathe. I just put the lathe on top of an existing workbench in my studio. I was able to turn this small lightweight plate WITH OUT bolting down or clamping down the lathe. No problem. See photo.

For this review I am using the PM banjo and tool rest that ships with the PM 2014 lathe. I supplied my own 4 Jaw Oneway Stronghold chuck and a good Oneway Live Center. I am NOT using the USELESS 60 degree live center that comes with the lathe. It is a WOOD SPLITTER!

Notes:

  1. The PM 2014 lathe, with out stand weights 185 lbs. For more specs see my Carl's New Powermatic 2014 Lathe!http://carlford.info/blog/2021/04/carls-pm2014-lathe/! blog entry.
  2. A week later, I made my own stand for new PM 2014 lathe. See my "Carl's New Powermatic 2014 Lathe Stand" blog entry.

Step by Step

I did NOT run into any problems with the PM 2014 lathe while making this plate. It is an easy project. Thus I was not expecting any problems.

Thus the rest of this blog entry is just a "step by step" how to turn a plate blog entry.

Photo: The Blank (pm2014_1st_plate_02) The Blank

Here is the plate blank mounted on my chuck. The blank is a chunk of hard maple wood. Roughly 1-1/4" thick by 10" in diameter.

I got started by just cutting the corners off the blank on the band saw. I made absolutely no attempt to make the blank round on the band saw. I have a lathe for making things round!

Drill Chuck Recess on TOP

The next step was to drill a 1/4" deep, 2-1/2" diameter hole in what will be the TOP of the plate. I then mounted the blank by EXPANDING the #2 jaws of my 4 jaw Oneway Stronghold chuck into the hole. I have found that this method works better than using a chuck screw. Because chuck screws and shallow holes don’t mix well. See my "Mounting Plates and Shallow Bowls" blog entry for more info.

Note: You can not see the chuck in this photo. See "Reverse the Blank" below for a photo of the chuck. However, in that photo, I have a set of bigger #3 tower jaws installed on the chuck. In this photo I am using the smaller #2 jaws on my Oneway Stronghold chuck. For more chuck info see my "Lathe Accessories for a New Turner" blog entry.

Photo: True Up (pm2014_1st_plate_04) True Up

First, I trued up the top of the blank. The top is on the headstock side of the lathe. The blank is cupped. I need to remove that cup. Remove as little wood as possible. I need to do this now. So, I known were the outside edge of the top will be later.

Cut Chuck Recess on BOTTOM

Then, I turned the outside of the blank to be round and cut a recess in the bottom for the #3 jaws on my Oneway Stronghold chuck.

At this stage I have left the blank as thick as possible. I did NOT true up the entire bottom of the cupped blank. If I did that, I would lose roughly 3/16" of my total blank height.

I used my 1/2" Bowl Gouge with a Al Stirt grind and my 88 Degree Spear Point tool. See my "Carl’s Modern Woodturning Tool Set" blog entry.

Photo: Bottom Roughed Out (pm2014_1st_plate_05) Bottom Roughed Out

Here, I have roughed out a nice roman ogee shape on the bottom of the plate.

I used my 1/2" Bowl Gouge with a Al Stirt grind and my 1/2” x 1/4” Left Hand Shear Scraper with Al Stirt grind.

Photo: Bottom Finished (pm2014_1st_plate_06) Bottom Finished

Now it is time to get fancy and earn those big bucks! I turned a nice bead near the rim. I turned the bead with my 1/2" Detail Gouge with an Al Stirt grind (the same grind Al uses on his 1/2" bowl gouge).

Then I added several bands of texture using my Sorby Spiraling tool. It looks like I was using the 4mm Sorby spiraling wheel. See my "Crown Verses Sorby Spiraling & Texturing Tool" blog entry.

I cut grooves to highlight the spiraling tool texture. I cut the grooves with my 88 Degree Spear Point tool.

Note: I hate sanding, more than you can imagine! I add texture to hide any imperfections. I do not sand.

Photo: Paint Bottom Black (pm2014_1st_plate_08) Paint Bottom Black

Time to paint all the texture and groves on the bottom with black dye.

Photo: Paint Bottom Brown (pm2014_1st_plate_09) Paint Bottom Brown

Time to paint it a nice light brown color. I used some discontinued Minwax stain, that use to come in a spray can. Then I applied 2 coats of clear acrylic finish.

Photo: Reverse the Blank (pm2014_1st_plate_10) Reverse the Blank

Time to change from the #2 jaws on my Oneway Stronghold chuck to the bigger #3 jaws. Then expand the #3 jaws into the recess I turned earlier.

Note: I am using the #3 TOWER jaws rather than the standard height #3 jaws. I have more than one chuck. The tower jaws were already installed on one of my chucks. Thus, I went with them. The standard height #3 jaws would be ok.

Photo: True up the Top (pm2014_1st_plate_11) True up the Top

I trued up the top and made it go slightly downhill into the center. I used my 1/2" Bowl Gouge with a Al Stirt grind and my 1/2” x 1/4” Left Hand Shear Scraper with Al Stirt grind.

I ALWAYS use the tailstock when truing up a rough piece of wood. Using the tailstock, takes a lot less time then going to the Emergency Room to get patched up.

I am using my good Oneway Live Center. I am NOT using the USELESS 60 degree live center that comes with the lathe. It is a WOOD SPLITTER!

Photo: Top Finished (pm2014_1st_plate_13) Top Finished

I added a nice spiral texture to the rim of the plate. The same, way I did the bottom. See "Bottom Finished" above.

Then I dished out the center of the plate. I used my 1/2" Bowl Gouge with a Al Stirt grind and my 1/2” x 1/4” Left Hand Shear Scraper with Al Stirt grind.

No texture in the center to hide any imperfections. Thus, I had to bite the bullet and sand the center.

Photo: Paint Top Black (pm2014_1st_plate_16) Paint Top Black

Time to paint all the texture and groves on the top with black dye.

Photo: Paint Top Brown (pm2014_1st_plate_17) Paint Top Brown

Time to paint it a nice light brown color. Then I applied 2 coats of clear acrylic finish.


Glamor Shots

Photo: Glamor Shots (pm2014_1st_plate_18)

Round and Brown with Pizzazz: 9.75" diameter. 1" thick. Maple wood. Black and brown stain. Semi gloss acrylic finish. The radial textures were done on the lathe with a spiraling tool.

Photo: Available on Etsy (pm2014_1st_plate_19) Available on Etsy

The plate is available in my Etsy "CarlFordWoodturner" store at www.etsy.com/shop/carlfordwoodturner/

It is also on my CarlFordWoodturner Instagram page. Click here to see it on Instagram.